My Latest Book

Things I Did When I Was Hangry: Navigating a Peaceful Relationship With Food

It’s about my personal struggles with eating and how mindfulness helped me find more peacefulness with food and with my life in general. It’s full of my own stories and also lessons from all of the amazing teachers I have studied with over the years including Thich Nhat Hanh, the Dalai Lama, Pema Chodron, Ann Weiser Cornell, and many others.

Available on kindle or print at Amazon or Barnes & Noble. Published by Parallax Press.

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Book Reviews

 

“This is a marvelous book, so real and realistic, around the issues of food and solutions in how to meet what we eat with care and mindfulness. Annie Mahon has offered us not only recipes for eating but recipes for living. I am so grateful.”
Roshi Joan Halifax, Abbot, Upaya Zen Center

“Annie Mahon didn’t just write a book about mindful eating; she wrote a courageously self-disclosing autobiography of eating – a story rich with generalizable insights and moments of awakening. Which is arguably the very point of mindful eating: to realize – in Mahon’s words – that ‘we can embrace the moment of eating and share it with others. Nothing else really matters’”
— Pavel Somov, Ph.D., Eating the Moment and Mindful Emotional Eating

“In a culture that encourages young girls and women to strive for physical perfection at any cost, Annie Mahon’s Things I Did When I Was Hangry is a breath of fresh air. With insight and vulnerability, Annie shows us that recovery from disordered eating patterns and body image issues is possible; that we can transform our relationship with ourselves, others and food by practicing simple acts of mindfulness, both in and out of the kitchen. Her message is both practical and inspirational.”
— Julie M. Simon, The Emotional Eater’s Repair Manual

“Annie, I am reading your book and it is one of the best books I have ever read about changing unpleasant habits (and I have read plenty). I read a little and have to digest it and then go on. Your writing style is as if I am sitting with you having a conversation. I will be passing this on to friends and family who are struggling with being authentic.”
— Gale Bowman-Harlow

“With courage and humility, Mahon reminds us that food—rather than being fraught with disconnection and discontent—can help us come to our senses. As we cook and eat, she gently encourages us to listen to our bodies, to reclaim our original natures, and to recall our deep and intimate membership in the wider world.”
— Tovar Cerulli, The Mindful Carnivore

“This is a deeply satisfying book. Annie Mahon’s writings and reflections on mindful eating, hunger, craving, gratitude and the middle way are irresistible. Writing with both wisdom and humor, she also includes some of her favorite vegan recipes. I highly recommend this important and timely book for readers seeking insight, support, and self-discovery.”
— Ronna Kabatznick, The Zen of Eating and Who by Water

“Annie’s compassionate writing addresses an issue of struggle for so many – every day eating. Through the sharing of her journey and struggles, you’ll gain insight into your own relationship with food, discover ways to work with disordered eating, and learn practical tips to adjust your palate and habits for overall well-being.”
— Kimberly Wilson, Tranquility du Jour Anthology and Tranquilista

“Beautifully written and compulsively readable, this book is a feast of compassion for the struggling, weak, suffering sides of us. It’s heaped full of comfort and practical help for anyone who struggles with painful emotions, self-doubt, and the desperate urge to not feel what we are feeling. Highly recommended, with a deep bow.”
— Ann Weiser Cornell, The Radical Acceptance of Everything and Presence

“Take one raw, hilarious, searingly honest, and compulsively readable memoir; fold in a wise, compassionate guide to mindful eating; and blend it with delicious vegetarian cookbook. That’s the recipe for Annie Mahon’s nutritious new book Things I Did When I Was Hangry. Whether you devour it in one sitting or savor it for days in small bites, this book is a feast for the spirit.”
— Anne Cushman, Moving Into Meditation


Hangry could be just as well titled honesty. It is a remarkably forthright account of the author’s love-hate relationship with food. Each reader will see their own consciousness in Annie’s struggles with self-doubt, and in her grasping at food as a sanity preserver. I was forever positively changed by reading Hangry, both in contemplation of myself and in consumption of my meals.”
— Martine Rothblatt, CEO, United Therapeutics